Filing suit in your Maryland personal injury case

Of the Cecil County and Maryland Auto Accident cases that my office handles, not all of them become lawsuits. Many of my clients initially come to me concerned about not wanting to sue anyone, or the concerns that go into such an undertaking. Roughly speaking, no more than 25% of the claims handled within my office require the filing of a lawsuit. Of those, even less actually go to trial. Most of these claims resolve via settlement prior to a lawsuit being filed, or resolve via settlement through the litigation process, but before trial. In Maryland, I believe around 3 or 4 percent of injury claims are actually resolved by a trial.

If your case does require litigation, there are usually two reasons this will happen:

  • There is a dispute or disagreement as to who is at fault for the accident
  • There is a disagreement as to the extent of injuries and/or value of the claim

The reason a case becomes a lawsuit is somewhat irrelevant to the litigation process to follow. Here are some tidbits as to what one would expect, should their case go to suit, as the process is usually new for most clients, and can be somewhat complicated and confusing:

  1. The attorney or law office will file the lawsuit, known as the ‘complaint’ with the appropriate court. Maryland has trial courts for each of the 24 counties(including Baltimore City) and each county has 2 levels of trial courts for these cases, District and Circuit Court. The court usually sets an initial trial date at this time, but that date often changes as the case proceeds.
  2. Within a few weeks, the court will return to the attorney a ‘writ of summons’ to be served onto the defendant(at fault party) in the case.
  3. The law office will usually contract a private process server to serve the writ of summons onto the other party.
  4. Once served, the other party should be communicating with their insurance company, who will assign an attorney to represent the defendant in the proceedings. If you have been sued for an auto accident, you should forward the documentation to your insurance company immediately.
  5. The parties, through their attorneys, will exchange information involving the claim through a process called discovery. Depending on which level of court and the value of the case, this process can be simple and quick, or long and drawn out.
  6. If the matter is not resolved through the early stages of litigation, some courts will schedule a settlement conference or some sort of mediation to attempt to resolve the matter.
  7. If all else fails to resolve the matter, trial will commence as scheduled (or re-scheduled).

Each county is different as far as timeframe and scheduling is concerned. Generally speaking, a district court lawsuit should go to trial within 4-6 months of the initial filing. Circuit Court trials can be quite different from county to county, and can go to trial anywhere from 9 months from filing to as much as 18 months in the more busy jurisdictions. More complicated cases with multiple parties involved, such as medical malpractice or wrongful death cases, can take even longer!

No matter what the scenario is, if a case you’re involved in is part of a lawsuit, it is incredibly important that you are available and accessible to your lawyer or their staff. Often times there are deadlines associated with aspects of these cases.

NOT GUITLY- Jury verdict- Baltimore City- Second Degree assault

Midday Tuesday, August 11, 2015 a Baltimore City jury returned a verdict of NOT GUILTY for our client in a trial handled by our associate attorney Elisabeth Hellwig. This isn’t one of those cases that will be found in any newspaper article, or even any online blogs, but it’s a great victory and justice for a client of ours who we believe was facing charges of assault in the second degree that were fabricated to further a custody dispute over a child that the alleged victim and our client have together.

These are often difficult cases to handle, as are many cases that we handle when we feel that the complaining party is attempting to further some other interest, in this case a custody/visitation dispute, through the Maryland Criminal Court system. We’re happy for our client, Attorney Hellwig, and the system as a whole, allowing for proper justice to be done.

 

State drops murder cases in Port Deposit area shooting

A case that I have been working as second chair on with a good colleague of mine here in Elkton, Maryland has finally been closed! This has been a case I’ve been working on with Edward Richitelli since opening my practice last year. It’s been one of the more difficult cases to handle, as it’s one where there has from the onset been a true belief that our client had nothing to do with the incident that brought rise to the charges.

When you believe your client is actually innocent, the stakes are much higher with less room for error.

After a number of successful hearings to suppress evidence unlawfully and unconstitutionally gathered by the State, as well as an unsuccessful attempt for the State to appeal one of those rulings, this past week the State finally opted to drop the charges against our client.

The local newspaper has provided their take on the state’s dropping of these charges. See the Cecil Whig article here.

Knowing what your accident case is worth

I wanted to discuss a variation on the common accident case value theme. This is, if you’ve been reading regularly, a fairly common theme with my posts as it is a common question that I get from my clients at many points throughout their claims. The main purpose of this particular post/article is to discuss the medical billing aspect of the process.

Myth: Many people are under the impression that your Maryland auto accident case is worth a multiplier of the total medical bills. That multiplier might be 2x or 3x or some 10x, but it’s a multiplier. This is entirely a myth. There is no hard and fast formula for determining the value of a Maryland auto accident case that fits nice and nearly into some variable type equation.

Each insurance company will use their own criteria to evaluate and make offers on cases, as will each judge or jury member weigh different aspects of testimony in determining a verdict, should a case go to trial and reach the verdict level.

The important thing to be aware of is whether or not the billing being submitted to the insurance carrier, judge or jury for consideration is the complete set of medical billing and/or records.

I receive a lot of litigation referrals from a number of law offices in Maryland. Sometimes, I also have clients who have fired a former attorney, or have had their case dropped, or for whatever reason have come to me after their case has been handled to some point by another lawyer or law office.

I recently took on one such case that was  handled by another firm, and for whatever reason the relationship between attorney and client broke down, and the client hired me. The entire file was forwarded to my office, and upon my review, I realized one major problem: A demand had been submitted to the insurance company, and was lacking no less than $6,000.00 in medical billing and the associated records to go along with that billing, and that’s just what I could determine in about 30 minutes of reviewing the file! Without a thought, the collection and submission of these bills would increase the previous offer by at least 20%. That’s a big number. That number is so big that it would almost offset the entire lawyer’s fees in the case!

The moral of the story is to be sure that a case being submitted to an insurance company, judge or jury for settlement is complete. This can be a daunting task for someone trying to handle a claim on their own, and clearly a difficult task for some that handle these cases professionally.

If you’re looking to have your case or an offer from an insurance company reviewed by someone with experience, contact me at (410) 885-6200. I will no review your settlement if you are represented by an attorney, as that wouldn’t be appropriate, but if you’re attempting to handle a claim on your own, I’ll gladly give you some of my time to take a look, and with no obligation discuss how I might be able to help you maximize the value of your claim.

A “grand deal” falls apart, benefits our client!

I recently represented a client who quite frankly did not have the best driving record here in Maryland. Through most of his adult life, he had a license that was on again off again suspended, revoked or expired for one reason or another. Client came to me to help represent him with two separate sets of charges related to driving without his license and/or driving while suspended. Typically, when I decide to take on one of these cases I stress to the client the importance of obtaining a valid Maryland license before the scheduled trial date. Unlike many lawyers I know, I offer to do the footwork for my clients in determining what they need to do in order to obtain a valid license. I won’t pay their tickets, or their child support, or take their driver improvement course, but I can help them navigate the often tricky system that is the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration. Often times, there are also suspensions arising out of out of state issues on the National Driving Registry. I once assisted another client in finding counsel in North Carolina to resolve some outstanding tickets and failure to appear warrants that were tying up her ability to renew her license here in Maryland.

Overall, in Maryland, most courts will have a degree of leniency if you are able to have a valid license by your court date. This by no means indicates that everything will just “go away” but what most prosecutors and judges are looking for regarding disposition and sentencing is much less if you have a valid license, than if you don’t. This leniency is quite a bit less if you’re a repeat offender, as is with most situations.

My client mentioned above had quite a storied history with the driving system here in Maryland, and had previously done time for these types of charges. An odd scheduling and rescheduling fluke had these 2 separate sets of charges scheduled for court at the same day, at the same time, but at two different Baltimore City Court houses (Patapsco Ave and Wabash Ave.)

I was working with two different prosecutors on 2 different situations, all for the same client. Our efforts were to work out some sort of “grand deal” which would have my client offer a guilty plea to the charges in one court, and be sentenced in such a way to reflect this deal, then the other charges would be dropped entirely.

By the time we arrived at court for the first set of charges, my client was eligible to get his license back. He had to go take the driving test, and we all know how those lines can be at the DMV. When discussing this with the prosecutor, we learned that the State had witness issues on this case, and that we likely would not be able to proceed as arranged. I ultimately convinced the State to drop the first set of charges completely, which rarely happens in situations like this. I had been in on this case at a previous appearance and the prosecutor was once seeking a straight term of 30 days for these same charges.

So, the deal fell apart. Client is still facing the other set of charges, which we go to court on this week. Client has a valid license now, and is poised for an overall much better result, and most importantly should be putting all of this behind him soon!

If you’re charged with driving without a license, driving on a suspended or revoked license, or any other similar charges, call our office at (410) 885-6200. We can not only help handle those charges, but guide you in getting your license back so that this is hopefully the last time you ever have to face charges like this again!

A valid Maryland driver's license is the key to not getting a driving without a license or driving on suspended charge.
A valid Maryland driver’s license is the key to not getting a driving without a license or driving on suspended charge.

Why did your attorney drop your Maryland accident case?

At least once a week I get a call from someone who has received a letter from the attorney who they initially hired to take on their Maryland auto accident or other personal injury claim stating that they can no longer represent them in this matter. There are a wide variety of reason that this may happen, and usually these individuals have no idea why. They haven’t received a call from the attorney, nor have they been able to get ahold of the attorney to get answers to this question.

Did your lawyer drop your maryland accident case? It's possible that he or she was just too busy to investigate properly.
Did your lawyer drop your maryland accident case? It’s possible that he or she was just too busy to investigate properly. We offer free evaluations of cases dropped by other lawyers by calling (410) 885-6200.

Now what?

Sometimes some cases are just not winnable. However, in some instances, there may be another reason, or perspective to be gained by discussing this with another attorney. My best estimate is that I accept one out of every three or four of these cases as they come in. The difficulty for me usually comes from the fact that the injured party really does not know why their case was dropped by the previous attorney, and are having difficulty getting answers. All attorneys are different, and have their own criteria on what cases they want to work with, and what cases they intend to file law suits in. Some lawyers don’t file lawsuits in any of their cases! This isn’t necessarily wrong, but if your case is one that would benefit from the initiation of a law suit, then you’re not going to get too far with a lawyer who doesn’t intend to file one.

I have also received calls from passengers in vehicles whose driver was at fault for the accident, and at the time that vehicle was uninsured. There are some specific measures that can be taken to obtain compensation in these situations, but some of them have a very strict notice requirement.

Some insurance companies will deny paying claims on accidents where the damage to the vehicle is less than some arbitrarily determined amount. While there have been countless studies refuting the correlation of large property damage to injuries, and some that even make the case that lower property damage can result in greater injuries, insurance companies also decide what cases to challenge, and which to pay.

If you’ve found yourself in receipt of one of these letters, do not hesitate to give my office a call at (410) 885-6200. We’re happy to take the time to meet with you and discuss the matter. While I do not guarantee that I’ll take on the claim, I will ask the right questions, dig a little deeper than some will, and if there is a reasonable possibility of recovery, we’ll take it on!

Jury Trial

It has been an interesting and certainly non-traditional journey for me to get to where I am now. Many who wish to become lawyers do so by going to high school, then to college, and then to law school. Typically, from my understanding, this is done in somewhat quick succession and often without delay. Not me, at least not without delay. I went to high school, then to undergrad in what is a more traditional succession. I left undergrad, degree nearly completed, as part of a work-study that was supposed to last one semester yet ended up being a two year journey beginning in Baltimore and ending in Chicago. I then returned to Maryland, not having completed my undergrad degree, and eventually began working in the law. I had no clue what I was really doing, and learned everything on the job. That was a positive experience, and quickly I went from a paper pusher to someone in an office with some responsibility. Then, realizing that I was being grossly underpaid, changed jobs to a larger firm for more money and less responsibility. At this point in time I began to complete my undergraduate degree. I transferred from the school I started with, and over a few years completed a bachelor’s degree. In this time I switched jobs again to a solo attorney for whom I would use a lot of my marketing background and sales experience to build a small firm into a high volume firm over the course of a few years. Before beginning law school at the University of Baltimore School of Law in August 2011 I got married and became a father of one(not particularly in that order, but this story is about my non-traditional style, right?). In the middle of my second semester I became a father again. I really hate when people use that verbage, but it seems to be what people say when something happens again. I had never ceased being a father, but I had another child.
My law school experience, like most other experiences in my life, have been a little different that what I observed everyone around me to be having. When I first arrived at new student orientation, I quickly realized that I was the only student that I spoke to that really knew what he or she wanted to do after school, moreover the only student who seemed to know why he/she was even attending law school. I had a plan, a plan B, and perhaps even a plan C depending upon how the 4 years of evening law school would develop. As with most plans, this changed somewhat, as the dynamic of my life certainly changed. As a night student I was in Baltimore to late hours 4 nights out of the week. In the first semester I was not getting home to Cecil County until nearly 11pm, waking up around 5:30 or 6am and starting all over again. When my son was born, there was no sleep really for several months. This was incredibly taxing on myself and my family–both physically, mentally and emotionally. In the fall of my second year I enrolled in a mix of courses evening and day classes, allowing me to be home 3 week nights and at school only 2. At this point I also switched my status to full-time day student so that I could take additional credits exceeding the max of 12. By the fall of the third year, I was down to my last 2 semesters. Overloading and taking full summer course loads allowed me to accelerate the 4 year degree plan into 3 years. It look a lot of maneuvering to be able to finish in the spring, and not have to take summer classes in my final year. I wanted to avoid taking courses when others were taking the bar. I didn’t want to be preparing for the bar when the July bar takers were being sworn in and beginning their careers. Much of these maneuvers involved a lot of self sacrifice. When I began law school I had a well paying full time job. Throughout this process I cut back hours, and released a lot of the responsibility that I had at the firm I was working for. Perhaps I was a positive catalyst at my old job, because as I became less involved the course of the firm took a different direction, and money became sparse. I left this job in November, mainly due to financial instability and my employer’s inability to pay me consistently. I feel that I a lot of what has happened to this point is the result of my desire to accelerate my degree program and become a lawyer a year earlier.

Nothing in life is free.

The fall of this final semester, however, awarded me a brilliant and fantastic opportunity that I would not have been able to undertake had I stuck to the night-only 4 year plan. Many schools thought out the country and the States that they’re in have programs that allow third year students with certain qualifications to practice in the non-profit areas in the local communities. Depending upon the practice areas, this may include low-income family law clinics, social security disability, immigration, or even criminal law though the State’s Attorney and Public Defender offices in the State. I was fortunate enough to be selected (it’s a lottery, so luck as much as anything else) to participate in the criminal law clinic, and under part of Maryland’s rule for admission became a lawyer within the confines of the Cecil County Public Defender’s office from August 2013 through January 2014. Due to scheduling issues with school that semester, most specifically the classroom component to this clinical experience, most of the work I was involved in was in the District Court. It was great experience, none the less, and I was able to work with hundreds of clients and hundreds of cases. Some I managed to have dropped completely, or get really good offers to plea for the clients so that they would be able to move past the infraction that I was representing them for and continue their lives with an opportunity for a clean criminal record.
It was only until December that I was able to do any real work in the Circuit Court. Many of the district court cases resolved in what is referred to as a “prayer for jury trial.” In Maryland, for those unfamiliar, there are two trial courts. The District Court is mainly the misdemeanor trial court, with no juries. There are some special felonies that can be tried in the District Court as well, but most of those are Circuit Court Cases. Also, any charges where the maximum penalty exceeds 90 days incarceration give the defendant the automatic right to request that their case be moved from the District Court to the Circuit Court, for a jury trial. Most of the cases taking this course do not actually result in filling the jury box with 12 citizens, but the mechanism is to request such a right. Often times this strategy is employed to get what is a big fish in a small pond into a larger pond, that is to say get a case into a court where they handle much more serious matters. Usually the plea arrangements are more favorable in the Circuit Court. Sometimes the strategy is one in which to buy time. Nearing the holidays defendants who know that they are likely to do jail time will pray a jury trial just to stay out of detention until after the holidays. Homeless defendants often will take pleas around these colder months for the purposes of being indoors when the adverse weather conditions may cause permanent injury or even death. In many cases defendant is charged with some violation involving the status of their driving privileges. For them, the delay offered in the jury trial scheduling will allow them to have their license reinstated or at least have taken substantial steps in the process before their trial date.

Sometimes, though, these cases go to trial.

When I first began this clinical experience, one of the “goals” expressed by the professors overseeing the clinic to the supervisor of the public defender’s office was that I would try 5 contested cases throughout the semester. My supervisor balked at this notion, doubting that in the time frame I was going to be there that the entire office was unlikely to try more than 5 contested cases, throughout the entire office! Finally, though, in January 2014 I had my hands on a case that the facts were disputed and the State wasn’t making an offer that my client wanted to take. It was finally, after all of this, time to fill the box and get down to business. Unlike many lawyers, in my observation, I want a trial. I want to fill the box, I want to do the work. Probably not limited to lawyers, but most in my experience are looking to go the path of least resistance. Get their money for a good plea deal and move on. More time handling a case means less money overall, or less time spent handling another case. Plus, I guess some people are scared to try cases. I’m wired differently, I suppose. I didn’t go to law school to not be a lawyer. I had a good job, a high paying job. I was making more money than most first year associates in my job. I could have gone on doing that, making more and more money each year, not being a lawyer. However, I would have been confined to the office, and not given the opportunity to try cases.

This is what I want to do.

It’s tough to try a case. Not so much the trial aspect of trying the case, but getting a case actually to go to trial. I’ve often thought, in criminal law, that any case that is worth trying is bad enough that the state should be dropping the case. Throughout the semester, at least in the district court, I prepared to try a lot of cases. I was ready to go. Then, when showing up to court the day of trial, something went wrong on the State’s side. They looked at their file, their witness didn’t show up, or they made a good enough deal that the client wanted to take it and move on. Every case I thought I was going to get to try, went away.
I’m not a glutton for pain or punishment. I advised each client of the benefits and downfalls of any plea deal offered. I want what is in the best interest of the client, and will continue to do so once I become a lawyer. The client rules the day. Fortunately for me I had a guy who didn’t want any offer, even a really good offer up to the point where we were about to select jurors.

I got my trial.

It went almost exactly as I thought it would. I had prepared for some time for this case, knew there was a likelihood that a jury would find my guy guilty. However, there were a lot of inaccuracies and discrepancies in the accusing victim’s statement and story that I felt the case was worth trying. I was incredibly happy with how the trial went. I felt that I highlighted all of the inaccuracies/discrepancies that I wanted to bring the jury’s attention to. I personally did not feel that there was enough evidence to convict my client.

The jury disagreed with me.

Such is life. My guy was found guilty. I didn’t know how I’d feel if I got a guilty verdict. I didn’t know if it would be discouraging to me, make me shy away from trials, or whatever. None of this has happened. Unfortunately my time as a student attorney is over. My carriage turned into a pumpkin last friday afternoon, and I am back to civilian life…for now. One semester of law school to go. Graduation in May, bar exam in July, and assuming all goes as planned, admission to practice in December 2014. Then I will have far less restrictions in my effort to try more cases.

No doubt, one day, I will become a little more jaded, a little less enamored with the idea of going to trial. I think the goal for me needs to avoid this and delay these feelings at all cost. I need to be conscious of the fact that the practice of law is referred to as the “practice” of law for a reason. Looking back on the trial, there may have been some minor things that I would have done a little differently. Facts or occurrences that I may have emphasized a little more or a little less. None of which I feel would have turned the case, but I would be foolish to think that I couldn’t have done better, made the jury deliberate longer. My client was happy with the trial, not necessarily the outcome, but he knows that we put it all on the table. I had prepped with the client about the case several times. He knew what I planned to do, agreed with it, and felt that it was done the way we planned. He even thanked me again the next day for the effort when he had to show back up at the courthouse for a pre-sentencing investigation.

It is possible that in sentencing this guy is offered probation before judgment at the culmination of any incarceration given by the court. I feel good about this. If the guy didn’t do it, then he has a chance to earn a clean record after he does his time.

I’m hungry to practice. Hungry to be in the mix. I have another trial advocacy course in the spring, and lobbied with the school to allow me to extend my Rule 16 placement.

My time will come.

Horrible advice….

So I was recently pulled over, accused of speeding by the officer. Being the person I am, of course I requested a trial. Recently I began doing some research on how to possibly fight this ticket, 82 mph in a 65mph zone. I started by looking for some cross examination questions. One of the first sites that I found that wasn’t a paid advertisement for a local lawyer wanting me to pay them to fight the ticket, was an article on nolo.com. If you are unfamiliar with nolo.com and their series of books, the concept is that through these articles and books you can essentially represent yourself. If this one article is a reflection of the body of work, they cannot be more wrong. Here is a link to the traffic cop cross examination questions from nolo.

First of all, I’m not even a lawyer yet. Secondly, I haven’t tried 100s or 1000s of cases throughout my career. However, I do understand the fundamental principals behind cross examination. You’re not really supposed to ask questions. I mean, you ask “questions” because you expect a response, but you don’t ask anything that warrants anything but a response. Almost every question in this cross examination asks for an answer, not a response.
Essentially, the point of cross examination is to ask yes/no “questions” that you already know the answer to, and if you don’t get the answer you expect that it should become clear and apparent to the judge or jury that the person who is on the stand is lying.

Here are some of my favorites:
“Were you paying attention to the other traffic in order to drive safely?”

This seems like you know what answer you’re sure to get–but there are ways to answer this question, or break it down into a series of questions, that will ensure that you get the right answer(s). Plus, this could be objected to as either a compound question or one that lacks proper foundation, as the foundation for the question is argued within the question.

This works much better:
Officer, you previously testified that there was [light/moderate/heavy] traffic at the time you began pacing my vehicle?
(here you are asking the officer to repeat from his/her previous testimony- he/she will either give you a YES or obviously lie)

You’ve been a licensed driver for most of your adult life?

You’re accustomed to driving in this type of traffic?

Safety is among the most important aspects of your job, right?

In fact, your job is to guarantee safety on the roadways, and other places of the sort?

So, when driving in this much traffic, it’s important to pay attention to many of the cars that are near you?

While you were pacing my car, you were also keeping your eye on 3-4 other cars?
[Boom-this is the question that you don’t care what answer you get] Here you have set a trap, and there isn’t a right or a wrong answer. The officer is either forced to admit that he wasn’t being safe, or he wasn’t focusing entirely on pacing your vehicle.

Do not fall into the trap of asking the next question. On courtroom TV dramas the attorneys often ask the next question “so you weren’t being safe” or “so you couldn’t have been paying complete attention to my car” which would illicit a breakdown of the witness on the stand.
THIS DOES NOT HAPPEN IN REAL LIFE.

If you make the mistake of asking the “ultimate question” then you’re going to get an answer, not a response. The officer will explain the flaw in your logic, and explain in some way that his training and years of this type of work have taught him to track multiple cars at once with accuracy, or perhaps even a better answer that will really throw you for a loop.

Moral of the story 1) hire a lawyer and 2) if you are ever cross examining someone, don’t ask the ultimate question.

and in just the blink of an eye….

The last time that I blogged was a week into the semester. I had begun my clinical course, and was thrown into the fire when an attorney called in sick. Time has flown by, and we are just a few weeks until the end of the semester. This semester has blown by. It literally seems like only yesterday that I handled my first case on the record, and now I’ve handled over a hundred.

No trials yet, which is somewhat disappointing, but somewhat expected given the court that i’m working in and the lack of “volume” of cases. A lot of counties in Maryland have courts with 30 or 40 cases on the morning or afternoon docket for each of 4 or 5 or sometimes more courtrooms. Baltimore City has 3 separate district court houses for criminal matters, and a completely separate 4th court for civil matters in the district court. In Cecil County the morning docket is about 20-30 cases total (for the state) in each of 2 courtrooms. This is a mix of criminal and serious traffic matters. In the afternoon, many times there is only one courtroom handling serious traffic and criminal, the other is either closed or handling speeding tickets and other payable traffic matters.

I have had a great experience, working with clients and preparing cases for the potential of trial. In doing so, I have learned that almost any case that is worth putting on trial for the defense, isn’t particularly good for the State. What I have learned without doubt, is that preparation on the defense side often pushes these cases into “worth dropping charges” as far as the State is concerned.

I have realized that the most important asset that a good attorney often has is preparation. Not that it took any time or effort to come to this conclusion, but seeing this in action is huge. Unlike the State’s Attorney, you actually have access to your client. You can meet with them, get at least their side of the story, and pick it apart from there. Often times the ASA only has a police report, limited access to the officer who filed the report (but didn’t witness the offense) and if there is any level of innocence on the part of your client, you have the advantage and ability to find it.

The semester has so far proven to be a great learning experience as far as client advocacy is concerned, and really gaining a comfort level in the courtroom.

I am not looking forward to it ending. While it’ll be another chapter closed, and another step closer to graduation and admission to the bar, it’ll be the bench mark to what should be one full calendar year of me not being in the courtroom on the record. This will be the sad part of the story.

UNSTOPPABLE REBEL FORCE

It’s on.

Tomorrow I will start taking on some cases. While I will start with some soft-balls, stets and noelle prosqui, it’s time to start getting the feet wet. The goal is to become an all-out litigation machine by the end of this semester. I am already enrolled in trial boot-camp, so to speak. Trial advocacy class kicks into high gear next week when we have direct and cross examinations to prepare and to be critiqued upon. This will continue all semester, polishing the basic skills of setting a theme, getting the story to the jury, and challenging witnesses and their testimony.

Brilliant.

The clinic, while I will be taking on baby cases in the beginning, will have similar training in the classroom component. I am also learning the “rules” aspect of both criminal and civil cases in Maryland in my other 2 classes.

Let’s win.

Yeah, the trial team I was on last year now has 2 full teams from our school, and the gloves come off around September 9th when the competition problem is released.

It’s time to crush it and become a complete machine by November 16th competition date, and beyond.

It is time to bring back the tag I put on the Ravens Superbowl run last season: Unstoppable Rebel Force.